• What to do with Mycoplasma Genitalium this year?

    A reporty back on David Lewis and Catriona Bradshaw's presentation Clinical Management and Therapeutics – MGEN Symposium.

    After a morning of antimicrobial resistant gonorrhoea, it was time to turn our attention to antimicrobial resistant Mycoplasma genitalium (MG).  Prof. David Lewis set the scene by outlining the prevalence (about 1-2%) and clinical role of MG and perhaps it was more a case of what we don’t know than what we do.  While the association between MG and non-gonococcal urethritis in men is clear, it is less certain when it comes to proctitis, epididymitis and balanoposthitis. 

     

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  • The current state of antimicrobial resistant gonorrhoea

    A report back on David Speers, Deborah Williamson, Cameron Buckley, David Lewis and Jana Sisnowski prese

    A/Prof. David Speers kicked off the discussion of antimicrobial resistant gonorrhoea this morning as he delivered the Dr Morris Gollow’s lecture during the opening plenary.  Gonorrhoea has been steadily developing resistance to whichever antibiotic has been used to treat it since the sulfa based drugs in 1937.  David described the multiple mechanisms that Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses to incorporate antimicrobial resistance and while it raises serious concerns about our ability to treat this infection in the future, one can’t help but admire its innovation and resilience!  ​

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  • Emerging evidence - weight gain and INSTIs

    A report on Professor Jenny Hoy's presentation New issues with INSTIs

    Professor Jenny Hoy gave an excellent presentation about the emerging evidence in relation to weight gain associated with integrase inhibitors, as well as an assessment of the clinical relevance of these findings.

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  • Dilemmas prescribing ART in pregnancy and women living with HIV

    A report on Moira Wilson's Pregnancy and women living with HIV, current guidelines and changes presentation

    This session focused on dilemmas in prescribing ART to pregnant women living with HIV in the context of a paucity of strong evidence/evolving evidence to guide clinical decision making.

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  • Are we doxy-PrEPared?

    A report on the debate moderated by Lewis Marshall, "Doxycycline should be provided for syphilis prophylaxis in those at high risk" 

    Prof Lewis Marshall was a lively and entertaining referee for the match between Prof Basil Donovan (in the blue corner) and Prof Kit Fairley (in the red), on the subject of “syphilaxis” or “doxy-PrEP” – the use of daily doxycycline as pre-exposure prophylaxis against syphilis infection in high-risk individuals. 

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  • Challenges, knowledge and inspirations

    A report back on the Australasian Sexual Health and HIV&AIDS Conference 2019. 

    I work across the in-patient, (midwifery) setting, in the outpatient arm of our health service providing breastfeeding support, sexual health, women's health, and refugee health services. We collaborate regularly with the Aboriginal Health Service. I bear witness to the traumatising effects of colonisation on First Nation Peoples within our region. I see this as the number one priority, and few months ago I was elected to the Swan Hill Rural City Council  

    My 'bio' almost speaks to the challenges of providing sexual health care in the regions. Taking on many roles, filling gaps, but also understanding the impacts of limited services, difficulty retaining medical staff, and the tyranny of distance. 

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  • PrEP Is Not A Condom Substitute

    A report back on Garry Kuchel’s presentation ‘Syphilis in Gay/MSM in WA - Epidemiology & Emerging Trends’ 

    Garry was a friendly, passionate and entertaining presenter who set out to stir the pot and drive home the worrying message that men who have sex with men (MSM) may not be taking STIs seriously anymore. He emphasised the alarming trend of an increase in condomless anal sex, as well as a blasé attitude amongst some members of the MSM community towards STIs, which are now being widely considered “easily treated” and therefore nothing to worry about.

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  • Doxycycline: What Is It Good For? Absolutely Not PrEP.

    A report back on Vincent Cornelisse’s presentation ‘Attitudes Towards and Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Sexually Transmitted Infections in Australia; An Online Survey’ 

    The charismatic Vincent Cornelisse delivered the results of a large online survey regarding the use of doxycycline as pre and post exposure prophylaxis for STI’s by men who have sex with men (MSM). The use of doxycycline is not recommended or indicated for such a purpose in any Australian guideline, and the evidence for its use overseas is questionable at best. Despite this, a whopping 13% of MSM participating in the study responded that they had used doxycycline as STI prophylaxis, which equates to hundreds of men. Perhaps what is even more disturbing is that 50% of these men reported getting the doxycycline prescribed by their GP (and the rest possibly ordering it online). 

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  • Viable and Dead Chlamydia Trachomatis

    A report back on Miss Nicole Lima's presentation 'VITA RT-PCR, A MOLECULAR TEST FOR THE DETECTION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF VIABLE AND DEAD CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS'

    The final presentation of day 1 of the conference proved rewarding as Nicole Lima introduced us to the VITA RT-PCR, a molecular test which allows for the differentiation of viable and dead Chlamydia trachomatis and the potential impacts this test could have on clinical practice.

    Current testing for Chlamydia using nucleic acid amplification tests detect the DNA of Chlamydia but tells us little about its viability. DNA can persist for a long time after effective treatment of Chlamydia and in patients who have been exposed to but self-cleared Chlamydia.

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  • A GP's perspective

    A report back on Teddy Cook and Shoshana Rosenberg’s presentation, ‘The inaugural Australian Trans and Gender Diverse Sexual Health Survey: Barriers, Resilience, and the Impact of Trans-Led Research’ 

    I was delighted to see trans sexual health included in the opening plenary of the ASHM Sexual Health conference this year. Teddy Cook (Manager, Trans & Gender Diverse Health Equity, ACON) and Shoshana Rosenberg (University Associate, Curtin University) presented the findings from the largest ever Australian sexual health survey relating specifically to the trans and gender diverse (TGD) community. 

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